Why Not Me? #UNGA Conversations That Reflect My Younger Self.

 

              “You can do great things if only you weren’t busy doing little things” – Unknown

The annual United Nations General Assembly brings together world leaders to brainstorm on sustainable solutions to the world’s pressing challengesand this year’s UNGA was not an exception. As a community builder this was the most touching and inspiring gathering for all the speakingengagements and platforms I spoke at, as well as coverage I made on behalf of the United Nations Foundation and the Social Good community. Theclimax of it all was the launch of the #Youth2030 strategy by the UN Secretary General, Antonio Guterres and UN Youth Envoy, JayathmaWickramanayake which gives renewed hope to young people around the world. It’s such a great time to be alive.

 

 

My week began with a brainstorm session with fellow plus social good connectors and advisors at Breakthrough Foundation about Global Goals Labs.This provided a great opener for us to continue the year long planning and discussion in person so as to give a sense of direction for the program. Refreshing as it was, we officially kick-started the UNGA and Global Goals week on this note.

 

 

My personal theme of reflection for all activities that took place during the UNGA week was “Why not me?” This is because I have finally come to the realisation that everything that I dreamt about is possible and within reach so, why not me making a deference in the world? Of course why not me? My day continued after the brainstorm at Breakthrough Foundation. Walking straight to the Facebook Office to deliver my speech about the values that young people add to development as well as sharing my alumni testimony on behalf of Junior Achievement Africa. Growing up, I was privileged to have all these opportunities to improve upon my leadership capabilities and it dawned on me how far a journey I have come since the old high school days. Why not me representing a generation of young leaders who are hungry to contribute towards development in their respective countries?

 

 

Social Good Summit was next, and it is by far, my favourite summit yet! The conversations were centred on youth and children and it really touched the core of my childhood, as it provided all the answers I always asked about youth engagement. Why are young people always left out when it comes to decision making? Why are young people always seen as incompetent in various leadership roles. I am a victim of this stigma and I am grateful to all who continue to believe in me and see great value in my voice, capabilities and strengths. No young person deserves this kind of stigma. All lives matter. This fight I have fought very well and won by giving other young people a voice to do what they are most passionate about and by also proving everyone wrong that young people too are capable of making a difference in the world. This is the more reason why I was happy when the United Nations decided to work with and include young people in all decision making facets of development. Young people have all the passion and energy to produce the results that most leaders of today are feeling reluctant to. SO why not us?

 

 

I acquired a lot of knowledge about international trade, sustainable development and data during all sessions of the SDG Media Zone where leaders of nonprofits, social enterprises and leading organisations around the world expressed their solutions for a better world.These solutions have shaped my way of thinking and have made it possible for me to transfer what I learnt to my community initiatives, SocialGood Ghana and Educational Communities Worldwide. As always, I am looking for innovative ways to engage my growing community of entrepreneurs, activists and community leaders. My doors are therefore open to any form of collaboration.

 

What advice would you give to your younger self? My message to all young people reading this update is that you can do great things if only you weren’t busy doing little things. So why not you?

 

 

 

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