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A military doctor treats the injuries his comrades incur during war, training, peacekeeping or routine activities. He administers to casualties of natural disasters in international relief efforts. He will possess combat skills to protect himself and everyone around him. 

As you listen to Richard Asare speak, you recognize he has the right disposition to enlist in the military. He is deliberate and focused and shoots his answers straight and sharp.

He describes himself as someone serious, disciplined, and who means business every day. “I wake up at 4:30 am, read a bit, and then get prepared for university. Classes last till 4:30 pm. When I close, I sometimes go for a siesta to ease stress. I wake, wash down and then get myself supper. I read again afterwards and then retire to bed by 12:00 am latest. So roughly I sleep for a maximum of 5 hours in a day.”

His parents say he wanted to become a doctor from the age of 5. “I was very attuned to how others feel, especially when a friend would injure himself during play. I would show much affection and apply some basic first aid that we have as kids.”

The resolve hardened when his favorite grandmother passed away because of the lack of medical attention. Richard exerted himself at school – he won several academic awards, became his class prefect, was a vibrant group leader and an active member of the First Aid Club.

After high school, he taught Maths, integrated science and ICT for a year at his junior high school. He is now studying medicine and surgery at the University of Cape Coast and wants to specialize in either cardiology or neurosurgery. Once he gains 2 years of work experience, he will sign up for the military.

Richard wishes to strive for people like his role model Dr Kwabena Frimpong-Boateng, Ghana’s first cardiothoracic surgeon, and be an asset for the country. He dislikes watching people get cheated or oppressed. His experience as a teacher has taught him how to influence people around him.

“For one to be a good counselor, he must first be a very good LISTENER. He must be moral and experienced. If he is inexperienced but well-read, he can cite several examples and instances to explain a particular case or scenario. He must also know temperament types as well. And the person must not be quick to judge. And finally, the person must be very secretive.” 

Richard finds it difficult to express his emotions, so wants to articulate his empathy better. He would like to be highly proficient at technology and, if given the chance, would love to learn to operate all kinds of automobiles. 

Interview conducted by: Hajra Mirza

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